Color Starts with the Ceiling Live Green Better Homes and Gardens Real Estate

Color Starts with the Ceiling Live Green Better Homes and Gardens Real Estate

Find a Neighborhood

Your request is directing you to a Web site that is owned and operated by a Better Homes and Gardens® Real Estate brokerage. The site will contain local listing information that meets your search criteria. Different terms of use and privacy policies will apply.

Your request is directing you to a Web site that is owned and operated by a Better Homes and Gardens® Real Estate brokerage. The site will contain local listing information that meets your search criteria. Different terms of use and privacy policies will apply.

Color Starts with the Ceiling

Is your ceiling in need of some attention? Color can help with that.

Courtesy of Better Homes and Gardens®

You might have grown up with this concept: a white ceiling is the right ceiling. A ceiling didn’t really represent a design element in a room. It was just, well, the ceiling. Hovering above, just hanging around, and feeling jealous every time the other walls received new coats of paint.

Look up and don’t overlook the potential that a ceiling can offer to a room. Certain colors and trims can make a room feel larger, smaller, formal or casual. Ceiling colors can offer contrast and character.

Light vs. Dark Ceilings: As a general rule, ceilings that are lighter than the walls feel higher, while those that are darker feel lower. «Lower» need not mean claustrophobic: Visually lowered ceilings can evoke cozy intimacy.

Light Sources: As with wall colors, consider the source and strength of light the room receives during the time you’re most often using it. Bright daylight bouncing off a blush pink or sky blue ceiling creates an airy feeling; candlelight and lamplight reflecting on tomato red produce a rich glow.

Paint Finish: Ceiling paint is usually flat, but an eggshell or satin finish paint offers just a hint of reflective sheen — a benefit if you’re using a darker color. Realize, however, that a ceiling must be in near-perfect condition since higher-sheen paints can call attention to surface flaws.

Color on the ceiling can enhance a room’s character, but beware of excess: for primary living areas, keep the ceiling treatment simple so you don’t grow tired of it.

A shade of white is a good choice

when you want to wrap the room

in bold color.

Classic White

White ceilings are often the best choice for a room. White overhead tends to disappear, so your attention focuses on the walls and furnishings.

A white ceiling also offsets intense wall color: boldly colored walls look crisp and sharp, and the ceiling feels higher. If the walls are pale and therefore space-expanding, a white ceiling opens the space even more.

In rooms that receive scant natural light, a white ceiling helps boost the perceived illumination by reflecting whatever light is available.

Like any other color element in the room, a white ceiling needs an echo, something to help integrate it into the scheme: Woodwork, carpet, draperies, and even bedding can serve the purpose. Otherwise the room will feel out of balance.

Which white is right? The basic ceiling white can look too stark and clinical, but paint companies offer a range of cool and warm whites, so select one with the warm or cool undertones you’d like to bring into your room.

In boldly colored rooms,

handsome architectural features

are enhanced with white.

Contrast Color

Applying a contrasting color to the ceiling can dramatically alter your perception of the space. It’s like a reflector bouncing light down into the room, and the quality of that light affects the room’s character.

Find a Neighborhood

Your request is directing you to a Web site that is owned and operated by a Better Homes and Gardens® Real Estate brokerage. The site will contain local listing information that meets your search criteria. Different terms of use and privacy policies will apply.

Your request is directing you to a Web site that is owned and operated by a Better Homes and Gardens® Real Estate brokerage. The site will contain local listing information that meets your search criteria. Different terms of use and privacy policies will apply.

Color Starts with the Ceiling

Is your ceiling in need of some attention? Color can help with that.

Courtesy of Better Homes and Gardens®

You might have grown up with this concept: a white ceiling is the right ceiling. A ceiling didn’t really represent a design element in a room. It was just, well, the ceiling. Hovering above, just hanging around, and feeling jealous every time the other walls received new coats of paint.

Look up and don’t overlook the potential that a ceiling can offer to a room. Certain colors and trims can make a room feel larger, smaller, formal or casual. Ceiling colors can offer contrast and character.

Light vs. Dark Ceilings: As a general rule, ceilings that are lighter than the walls feel higher, while those that are darker feel lower. «Lower» need not mean claustrophobic: Visually lowered ceilings can evoke cozy intimacy.

Color Starts with the Ceiling Live Green Better Homes and Gardens Real Estate

Light Sources: As with wall colors, consider the source and strength of light the room receives during the time you’re most often using it. Bright daylight bouncing off a blush pink or sky blue ceiling creates an airy feeling; candlelight and lamplight reflecting on tomato red produce a rich glow.

Paint Finish: Ceiling paint is usually flat, but an eggshell or satin finish paint offers just a hint of reflective sheen — a benefit if you’re using a darker color. Realize, however, that a ceiling must be in near-perfect condition since higher-sheen paints can call attention to surface flaws.

Color on the ceiling can enhance a room’s character, but beware of excess: for primary living areas, keep the ceiling treatment simple so you don’t grow tired of it.

A shade of white is a good choice

when you want to wrap the room

in bold color.

Classic White

White ceilings are often the best choice for a room. White overhead tends to disappear, so your attention focuses on the walls and furnishings.

A white ceiling also offsets intense wall color: boldly colored walls look crisp and sharp, and the ceiling feels higher. If the walls are pale and therefore space-expanding, a white ceiling opens the space even more.

In rooms that receive scant natural light, a white ceiling helps boost the perceived illumination by reflecting whatever light is available.

Like any other color element in the room, a white ceiling needs an echo, something to help integrate it into the scheme: Woodwork, carpet, draperies, and even bedding can serve the purpose. Otherwise the room will feel out of balance.

Which white is right? The basic ceiling white can look too stark and clinical, but paint companies offer a range of cool and warm whites, so select one with the warm or cool undertones you’d like to bring into your room.

In boldly colored rooms,

handsome architectural features

are enhanced with white.

Contrast Color

Applying a contrasting color to the ceiling can dramatically alter your perception of the space. It’s like a reflector bouncing light down into the room, and the quality of that light affects the room’s character.


Leave a Reply