Indoor Air Quality, Mold

Indoor Air Quality, Mold

New Ceiling Tiles | 800-518-9835 | Sales@NewCeilingTiles.com

Sick Building Syndrome (SBS) – Indoor Air Quality (IAQ)

As time goes by SBS and IAQ will become a bigger and bigger problem for schools, offices, etc.

As with asbestos and lead in paint, the problem will eventually become a problem mandatorily regulated by the government.

What most do not understand is that air tight rooms, offices, etc, are still relatively new. Up until as late as the 60’s schools, offices, homes, etc were not essentially sealed-up as they are today. Windows were opened on a regular basis for fresh air circulation since most did not have a/c or just used fans.

By the 70’s the windows in homes, schools, offices, etc started to be closed-up and the air-conditioning or heating 24/7 operated year round. By 1980 (only 27 years) ago the problems really got started.

What problems you may ask?

1. Poor/Unhealthy IAQ (Indoor Air Quality)

2. SBS (Sick Building Syndrome)

What causes SBS is poor indoor air quality, and poor indoor air quality is caused by:

1. Air Conditioner Coils growing mold & bacteria, which get re-circulated throughout the enclosed environments.

2. Carpeting that can harbor bacteria, dust, allergens, etc.

3. Traditional ceiling tiles can grow bacteria, mold, mildew and more.

4. Walls, floors, etc that are made of wood and other materials that can grow mold, mildew, bacteria.

5. Furniture, draperies, & clothing can even contribute to IAQ.

IAQ deteriorates as the above conditions are in play. Most problems grow due to poorly maintained systems or systems needing replacement.

What most do not do is properly clean the air ducts, coils, ceiling tiles, carpet, etc.

In most cases proper cleaning that is done frequently can handle the problem, but in some cases only replacing the problem causing items will help.

Carpet can be cleaned as long as it has not gotten soaking wet. When wet the padding under the carpet can (and in most cases does) grow moldy. In some cases carpet and padding need to be replaced.

Traditional ceiling tiles can be cleaned on the visible surface, but in a lot of cases they have problems on the topside, which is only seen when removed. This is where mold, bacteria, and mildew will grow. When the stain shows through on the bottom (visible) side it means the top (unseen) side is much worse considering that is where the problem starts. So even if the water has not soaked through to stain the visible side you could still have a huge problem festering and never realize it.

Water from condensation due to humid air conditions, pipe & roof leaks, etc will damage most traditional ceiling tiles.

Just because your ceiling tiles and carpet appear to be clean does not mean they are. Carpet problems, for the most part, can be detected easily since most water problems start on the visible side then soak toward the lining or padding, but ceiling tile problems are the opposite. The moisture usually enters where it can’t be seen and eventually makes itself known after the problem has advanced sufficiently.

Solutions

1. Air Conditioner parts such asthe coil must be checked and cleaned at least annually

2. Ducts cleaned annually

3. Carpet vacuumed daily and cleaned frequently (as often as monthly) with a dry solution Vs heavy steam or a wet solution.

4. Ceiling tiles cleaned quarterly and checked on the top-side to see if damage is present.

You can also replace the offenders — carpet and padding with different flooring, traditional ceiling tile with a PVC or Plastic-ceiling tile. This reduces your problems to just the A/C System and ducts which can be cleaned regularly and reduce costs in all aspects.

Cost due to SBS and IAQ

1. Cost of having traditional ceiling tiles cleaned quarterly

2. Cost of replacement ceiling tiles

3. Cost of manpower or having tiles replaced professionally

4. Cost of special carpet cleaning materials, equipment, and services

5. Cost of replacing padding below carpet

6. Cost of replacing carpet

7. Cost of A/C check and cleaning

8. Cost of duct cleaning

Cost of Health issues:

1. Poor indoor air quality will increase sick days

2. Poor IAQ will increase cost of health insurance costs

3. Poor IAQ will increase cost in maintenance of environment

4. Poor IAQ will increase cost due to lost man-hours due to illness caused by SBS, which is due to IAQ.

5. Poor IAQ can cost you business and customers, which in turn loses you sales.

6. Poor IAQ, over time, can lead to other health conditions that can decrease quality of life especially in homes and where employees spend many hours a day working.

7. Poor IAQ can cost you due to down time for correcting problems

All of this is still relatively new and is due to the airtight environments that we have come to live in and work in over the past 3-4 decades.

Enclosed: look at your office, doctors office (especially patients rooms), hospitals, etc. You essentially have four enclosed walls, floor, and ceiling and the air is re-circulated through air conditioner ducts, which start at an air conditioner return. All air is sucked in the return and then re-circulated throughout the ducts to all rooms with vents. So if the coil is dirty or growing mold or bacteria then you are re-circulating the contaminants to all rooms with vents. Ceiling tiles that are growing bacteria, mold, etc are contributing to the problem especially those located by the a/c returns. The more closed in the area the worse the problem. Think about places with more people in them especially sick people (hospital rooms and waiting areas). Their problems get re-circulated and more problems grow from there.

Any buildings (that are not open-air buildings or homes) that have central air and heat and especially with drop ceilings need, at the very least, to have their a/c, and ducts checked and cleaned often as well as their ceiling tiles (on both sides or have the ceiling tiles rep laced with plastic /PVC tiles).

Quotes from the CDC website @ CDC on IAQ

Factors Affecting Indoor Air Quality

SOURCES OF INDOOR AIR CONTAMINANTS

Unsanitary conditions and water damage

Contents

· microbiological growth in areas of surface condensation

· microbiological growth due to flooding or to leaks from roofs, piping

· fire damage (soot, PCBs from electrical equipment, odors)

Thermal Comfort

Humidity is a factor in thermal comfort. Raising relative humidity reduces the ability to lose heat through perspiration and evaporation, so that the effect is similar to raising the temperature. Humidity extremes can also create other IAQ problems. Excessively high or low relative humidity can produce discomfort, while high relative humidity can promote the growth of mold and mildew.

HVAC System

The HVAC system is generally the predominant pathway and driving force for air movement in buildings. However, all of a building’s components (walls, ceilings. floors, penetrations, HVAC equipment, and occupants) interact to affect the distribution of contaminants.

Chases, crawlspaces, plenum. and other hidden spaces can be both sources and pathways for pollutants.

Groups Affected by Poor Indoor Air Quality

Groups that may be particularly susceptible to effects of indoor air contaminants include, but are not limited to:

v allergic or asthmatic individuals

v people with respiratory disease

v people whose immune systems are suppressed due to chemotherapy, radiation therapy, disease, or other causes

New Ceiling Tiles | 800-518-9835 | Sales@NewCeilingTiles.com

Sick Building Syndrome (SBS) – Indoor Air Quality (IAQ)

As time goes by SBS and IAQ will become a bigger and bigger problem for schools, offices, etc.

As with asbestos and lead in paint, the problem will eventually become a problem mandatorily regulated by the government.

What most do not understand is that air tight rooms, offices, etc, are still relatively new. Up until as late as the 60’s schools, offices, homes, etc were not essentially sealed-up as they are today. Windows were opened on a regular basis for fresh air circulation since most did not have a/c or just used fans.

By the 70’s the windows in homes, schools, offices, etc started to be closed-up and the air-conditioning or heating 24/7 operated year round. By 1980 (only 27 years) ago the problems really got started.

What problems you may ask?

1. Poor/Unhealthy IAQ (Indoor Air Quality)

2. SBS (Sick Building Syndrome)

What causes SBS is poor indoor air quality, and poor indoor air quality is caused by:

1. Air Conditioner Coils growing mold & bacteria, which get re-circulated throughout the enclosed environments.

2. Carpeting that can harbor bacteria, dust, allergens, etc.

3. Traditional ceiling tiles can grow bacteria, mold, mildew and more.

4. Walls, floors, etc that are made of wood and other materials that can grow mold, mildew, bacteria.

5. Furniture, draperies, & clothing can even contribute to IAQ.

IAQ deteriorates as the above conditions are in play. Most problems grow due to poorly maintained systems or systems needing replacement.

What most do not do is properly clean the air ducts, coils, ceiling tiles, carpet, etc.

In most cases proper cleaning that is done frequently can handle the problem, but in some cases only replacing the problem causing items will help.

Carpet can be cleaned as long as it has not gotten soaking wet. When wet the padding under the carpet can (and in most cases does) grow moldy. In some cases carpet and padding need to be replaced.

Traditional ceiling tiles can be cleaned on the visible surface, but in a lot of cases they have problems on the topside, which is only seen when removed. This is where mold, bacteria, and mildew will grow. When the stain shows through on the bottom (visible) side it means the top (unseen) side is much worse considering that is where the problem starts. So even if the water has not soaked through to stain the visible side you could still have a huge problem festering and never realize it.

Water from condensation due to humid air conditions, pipe & roof leaks, etc will damage most traditional ceiling tiles.

Just because your ceiling tiles and carpet appear to be clean does not mean they are. Carpet problems, for the most part, can be detected easily since most water problems start on the visible side then soak toward the lining or padding, but ceiling tile problems are the opposite. The moisture usually enters where it can’t be seen and eventually makes itself known after the problem has advanced sufficiently.

Indoor Air Quality, Mold

Solutions

1. Air Conditioner parts such asthe coil must be checked and cleaned at least annually

2. Ducts cleaned annually

3. Carpet vacuumed daily and cleaned frequently (as often as monthly) with a dry solution Vs heavy steam or a wet solution.

4. Ceiling tiles cleaned quarterly and checked on the top-side to see if damage is present.

You can also replace the offenders — carpet and padding with different flooring, traditional ceiling tile with a PVC or Plastic-ceiling tile. This reduces your problems to just the A/C System and ducts which can be cleaned regularly and reduce costs in all aspects.

Cost due to SBS and IAQ

1. Cost of having traditional ceiling tiles cleaned quarterly

2. Cost of replacement ceiling tiles

3. Cost of manpower or having tiles replaced professionally

4. Cost of special carpet cleaning materials, equipment, and services

5. Cost of replacing padding below carpet

6. Cost of replacing carpet

7. Cost of A/C check and cleaning

8. Cost of duct cleaning

Cost of Health issues:

1. Poor indoor air quality will increase sick days

2. Poor IAQ will increase cost of health insurance costs

3. Poor IAQ will increase cost in maintenance of environment

4. Poor IAQ will increase cost due to lost man-hours due to illness caused by SBS, which is due to IAQ.

5. Poor IAQ can cost you business and customers, which in turn loses you sales.

6. Poor IAQ, over time, can lead to other health conditions that can decrease quality of life especially in homes and where employees spend many hours a day working.

7. Poor IAQ can cost you due to down time for correcting problems

All of this is still relatively new and is due to the airtight environments that we have come to live in and work in over the past 3-4 decades.

Enclosed: look at your office, doctors office (especially patients rooms), hospitals, etc. You essentially have four enclosed walls, floor, and ceiling and the air is re-circulated through air conditioner ducts, which start at an air conditioner return. All air is sucked in the return and then re-circulated throughout the ducts to all rooms with vents. So if the coil is dirty or growing mold or bacteria then you are re-circulating the contaminants to all rooms with vents. Ceiling tiles that are growing bacteria, mold, etc are contributing to the problem especially those located by the a/c returns. The more closed in the area the worse the problem. Think about places with more people in them especially sick people (hospital rooms and waiting areas). Their problems get re-circulated and more problems grow from there.

Any buildings (that are not open-air buildings or homes) that have central air and heat and especially with drop ceilings need, at the very least, to have their a/c, and ducts checked and cleaned often as well as their ceiling tiles (on both sides or have the ceiling tiles rep laced with plastic /PVC tiles).

Quotes from the CDC website @ CDC on IAQ

Factors Affecting Indoor Air Quality

SOURCES OF INDOOR AIR CONTAMINANTS

Unsanitary conditions and water damage

· microbiological growth in areas of surface condensation

· microbiological growth due to flooding or to leaks from roofs, piping

· fire damage (soot, PCBs from electrical equipment, odors)

Thermal Comfort

Humidity is a factor in thermal comfort. Raising relative humidity reduces the ability to lose heat through perspiration and evaporation, so that the effect is similar to raising the temperature. Humidity extremes can also create other IAQ problems. Excessively high or low relative humidity can produce discomfort, while high relative humidity can promote the growth of mold and mildew.

HVAC System

The HVAC system is generally the predominant pathway and driving force for air movement in buildings. However, all of a building’s components (walls, ceilings. floors, penetrations, HVAC equipment, and occupants) interact to affect the distribution of contaminants.

Chases, crawlspaces, plenum. and other hidden spaces can be both sources and pathways for pollutants.

Groups Affected by Poor Indoor Air Quality

Groups that may be particularly susceptible to effects of indoor air contaminants include, but are not limited to:

v allergic or asthmatic individuals

v people with respiratory disease

v people whose immune systems are suppressed due to chemotherapy, radiation therapy, disease, or other causes


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