There is a lot of condensation in my house the window sills are covered in water every

There is a lot of condensation in my house  the window sills are covered in water every

There is a lot of condensation in my house the window sills are covered in water every morning. How can I get rid of it?

There is a lot of condensation in my house the window sills are covered in water every morning. My son has asthma and I’m sure the damp isn’t helping. I’ve heard installing a mechanical ventilation system can help but I can’t afford it. Do you have any low cost suggestions?

5 Comments

Editor. May 8th, 2011 on 10:06 pm

A: It is very important to understand how and why condensation forms in a house – here’s a brief explanation.

Insulation

Heating

Double glazing

Mechanical ventilation systems introduce “outside” air into the house. This outside air is almost always drier than internal air and tends to force wet internal air out through gaps in the building. However, ventilation systems cost serious money, perhaps $2000 $3000. HEAC strongly recommends addressing the causes before spending money on an appliance you may not end up needing. Ask for a fact sheet on moisture issues from the HEAC advisor.

Produce Less Moisture Inside the House

We all produce moisture during our everyday activities in the home (breathing, washing etc) and it would be impossible to prevent all moisture, but you can reduce the amount you produce by:

Limit the time spent in the shower

Limit the number of pot plants in your house

Dry your clothes outside

If you use a clothes dryer, make sure that it is vented outside

If you must dry your clothes inside, do this in a well ventilated room with doors closed to the rest of the house

Close the doors to the bathroom and kitchen when you are bathing or cooking

Always wipe excess moisture from windows moisture collecting on the frame which may cause rotting. It may also re-evaporate during the day, raising humidity levels and making condensation worse when the room cools down.

Use extractor fans in “wet” areas such as bathrooms, kitchens, and laundries

Moisture from Outside

Moisture can enter the house through gaps in the ceiling envelope – leaky homes are an example of moisture entering the building. Check that all gaps and pipe penetrations are sealed against the weather, that rain guttering is not leaking and that it directs water away from the house. If your under floor or basement is damp, and there is inadequate ventilation, laying a polythene vapour barrier will reduce the amount of moisture entering the house through the subfloor.

Ventilation

Ventilation is really important. Air moving in from the outside is drier than air on the inside. even on a rainy day, opening two or more windows a small amount to encourage a cross draught will reduce the buildup of internal moisture. Fixing security stays to the windows may allow you to leave windows open while you are out.

Heating, Insulation, and Double Glazing

And lastly, heating and insulation are key. If your house is warmer then there is less likelihood of moisture condensation. Warm air can hold a lot more moisture than cold air, but remember that if you don’t reduce moisture or ventilate your home, the moisture in the air will condense on cooler surfaces.

Double glazing is also an option. This reduces condensation in two ways –

The internal glass is warmer (and therefore less likely to attract condensation) than a comparable single glazed window. This is because it is insulated from the outside air

Double glazing reduces the overall heat loss in a home thus reducing the likelihood of condensation.

Other Options

And if everything fails, try a dehumidifier (but be sure windows are closed when you use it) and last of all request an inspection by a company who deal with mechanical ventilation systems. But call the Home Energy Advisor first, we could save you a lot of money and worry by troubleshooting the basics first.

There is a lot of condensation in my house the window sills are covered in water every morning. How can I get rid of it?

There is a lot of condensation in my house the window sills are covered in water every morning. My son has asthma and I’m sure the damp isn’t helping. I’ve heard installing a mechanical ventilation system can help but I can’t afford it. Do you have any low cost suggestions?

5 Comments

Editor. May 8th, 2011 on 10:06 pm

A: It is very important to understand how and why condensation forms in a house – here’s a brief explanation.

Insulation

Heating

Double glazing

Mechanical ventilation systems introduce “outside” air into the house. This outside air is almost always drier than internal air and tends to force wet internal air out through gaps in the building. However, ventilation systems cost serious money, perhaps $2000 $3000. HEAC strongly recommends addressing the causes before spending money on an appliance you may not end up needing. Ask for a fact sheet on moisture issues from the HEAC advisor.

Produce Less Moisture Inside the House

There is a lot of condensation in my house  the window sills are covered in water every

We all produce moisture during our everyday activities in the home (breathing, washing etc) and it would be impossible to prevent all moisture, but you can reduce the amount you produce by:

Limit the time spent in the shower

Limit the number of pot plants in your house

Dry your clothes outside

If you use a clothes dryer, make sure that it is vented outside

If you must dry your clothes inside, do this in a well ventilated room with doors closed to the rest of the house

Close the doors to the bathroom and kitchen when you are bathing or cooking

Always wipe excess moisture from windows moisture collecting on the frame which may cause rotting. It may also re-evaporate during the day, raising humidity levels and making condensation worse when the room cools down.

Use extractor fans in “wet” areas such as bathrooms, kitchens, and laundries

Moisture from Outside

Moisture can enter the house through gaps in the ceiling envelope – leaky homes are an example of moisture entering the building. Check that all gaps and pipe penetrations are sealed against the weather, that rain guttering is not leaking and that it directs water away from the house. If your under floor or basement is damp, and there is inadequate ventilation, laying a polythene vapour barrier will reduce the amount of moisture entering the house through the subfloor.

Ventilation

Ventilation is really important. Air moving in from the outside is drier than air on the inside. even on a rainy day, opening two or more windows a small amount to encourage a cross draught will reduce the buildup of internal moisture. Fixing security stays to the windows may allow you to leave windows open while you are out.

Heating, Insulation, and Double Glazing

And lastly, heating and insulation are key. If your house is warmer then there is less likelihood of moisture condensation. Warm air can hold a lot more moisture than cold air, but remember that if you don’t reduce moisture or ventilate your home, the moisture in the air will condense on cooler surfaces.

Double glazing is also an option. This reduces condensation in two ways –

The internal glass is warmer (and therefore less likely to attract condensation) than a comparable single glazed window. This is because it is insulated from the outside air

Double glazing reduces the overall heat loss in a home thus reducing the likelihood of condensation.

Other Options

And if everything fails, try a dehumidifier (but be sure windows are closed when you use it) and last of all request an inspection by a company who deal with mechanical ventilation systems. But call the Home Energy Advisor first, we could save you a lot of money and worry by troubleshooting the basics first.


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