How to Install an Acoustic Tile Drop Ceiling — helpfulhandymanhints

How to Install an Acoustic Tile Drop Ceiling - helpfulhandymanhints

How to Install an Acoustic Tile Drop Ceiling

Do you have an ugly ceiling? Do you want to fix it up with acoustic ceiling tiles? You’ve seen them before, the ones that are in every office, hospital and government complex in the world? You and a friend can easily install acoustic ceiling tiles and a drop ceiling grid in no time at all with these easy to follow instructions and advice from helpfulhandymanhints.com.

To begin you need to lay out the room. Start by taking a length and width measurement of the area you want to cover with a drop ceiling. You don’t need to climb up a ladder and measure the walls, just measure along the floor from wall to wall. Now find the center of the room by dividing each measurement in half. Once you have located both centers make a mark on the floor. Now it’s time to order the materials.

Once the measurements are written down, draw a blueprint of the ceiling shapes and dimensions. It doesn’t have to be to scale, a rough drawing will work just fine. On your blueprint (A), draw a grid separating 4’ by 4’ sections (B). On my particular drawing I will need three pieces of Main “T”. Main “T” sections are what the entire ceiling grid is suspended from. Main “T” comes in 12’ lengths therefore I need 45’ linear feet of Main “T” which comes to 5 pieces each (I can cut one in half)

I also now need to add the materials for the 4’ sections of the ceiling grid that go between each Main “T”. Each 4’ piece of grid has a connector that hooks into place between two Main “T” sections.   “C” shows the placement of the 4’ grid sections relevant to the Main “T” and the 2’ grid sections. The J channel runs against any wall where the acoustic tile drop ceiling meets.

Using the diagram “C” you should be able to see how any dimension room can fit a drop ceiling provided there is enough clearance above the ceiling for the grid and suspension cables and enough clearance below.( Typically 8’ between the floor and drop ceiling, but no less than 7’)

Now order the material. Remember that the Main “T” is the most expensive, followed by the 4’ grid sections, and then the cheapest are the 2’ grid sections. Try to use as many 2’ sections as possible. Another point that you need to remember is that materials can only be cut one way. Each side can only be used once due to the fact that each side has a tab.

After you have the materials, begin by setting up two ladder and you and a partner hang each Main “T” from the old ceiling or joists. Use a rated ceiling grid wire and not just tie wire, even though each section of the grid is light, overall the weight will be quite heavy. Don’t worry about making the measurements perfect yet. Keep about the same measurement off of each wall to each Main “T”. Now nail some J channel around the walls only where you are hanging the first piece of grid. Why didn’t we hang the J channel around the walls first? It helps to define a correct height and makes for easy adjustment in the beginning stages of hanging the drop ceiling if we start small. Now that a good height has been establish between wall to wall and the first Main “T” has been set, it is time to hang the rest of the J channel.

Use a laser level or bubble level to make marks in each corner of each wall. Use a chalk line to snap straight lines around the walls for the J channel. Nail or screw the J channel in place. Now begin the Main “T”.

Take each Main “T” about every 4’ apart. Attach a few 4’ grid pieces in between the Main “T” sections as you work along. This will help keep each Main “T” at the correct   distance apart as you work from Main “T” to Main “T”. Once the Main “T” sections are complete, its time to move on to the next step.

Snap into place each 4’ grid section both vertically and horizontally. It makes the work go faster if you and you partner work towards each other from opposite ends of the room. Once all of the 4’ grid sections are in place, its time to assemble the 2’ sections.

The 2’ grid sections go between each 4’ section and probably around the walls depending upon your measurements of the room. Use tin snips to cut each of the 2’ grid sections as needed. Once all of the 2’ grid sections are in place and the grid is complete, it’s time to move on to the acoustic ceiling tiles.

Once the grid is done, your halfway home! Place each tile in the grid by rotating each acoustic ceiling tile diagonal through each grids 2’ x 2’ square. Once the tile is clear above the grid, lay the tile flat and set it in place. Cut the tiles as needed with a utility knife. Make sure you cut the tiles about 1/8 short to allow for room when you set the tiles. The acoustic ceiling tiles can be damaged very easily so you need to be careful about jamming tiles in that are to tight. With extra caution and patience you can finish your own acoustic drop ceiling in no time at all!

More Helpful Handyman Hints

How to Install an Acoustic Tile Drop Ceiling

Do you have an ugly ceiling? Do you want to fix it up with acoustic ceiling tiles? You’ve seen them before, the ones that are in every office, hospital and government complex in the world? You and a friend can easily install acoustic ceiling tiles and a drop ceiling grid in no time at all with these easy to follow instructions and advice from helpfulhandymanhints.com.

To begin you need to lay out the room. Start by taking a length and width measurement of the area you want to cover with a drop ceiling. You don’t need to climb up a ladder and measure the walls, just measure along the floor from wall to wall. Now find the center of the room by dividing each measurement in half. Once you have located both centers make a mark on the floor. Now it’s time to order the materials.

Once the measurements are written down, draw a blueprint of the ceiling shapes and dimensions. It doesn’t have to be to scale, a rough drawing will work just fine. On your blueprint (A), draw a grid separating 4’ by 4’ sections (B). On my particular drawing I will need three pieces of Main “T”. Main “T” sections are what the entire ceiling grid is suspended from. Main “T” comes in 12’ lengths therefore I need 45’ linear feet of Main “T” which comes to 5 pieces each (I can cut one in half)

I also now need to add the materials for the 4’ sections of the ceiling grid that go between each Main “T”. Each 4’ piece of grid has a connector that hooks into place between two Main “T” sections.   “C” shows the placement of the 4’ grid sections relevant to the Main “T” and the 2’ grid sections. The J channel runs against any wall where the acoustic tile drop ceiling meets.

How to Install an Acoustic Tile Drop Ceiling - helpfulhandymanhints

Using the diagram “C” you should be able to see how any dimension room can fit a drop ceiling provided there is enough clearance above the ceiling for the grid and suspension cables and enough clearance below.( Typically 8’ between the floor and drop ceiling, but no less than 7’)

Now order the material. Remember that the Main “T” is the most expensive, followed by the 4’ grid sections, and then the cheapest are the 2’ grid sections. Try to use as many 2’ sections as possible. Another point that you need to remember is that materials can only be cut one way. Each side can only be used once due to the fact that each side has a tab.

After you have the materials, begin by setting up two ladder and you and a partner hang each Main “T” from the old ceiling or joists. Use a rated ceiling grid wire and not just tie wire, even though each section of the grid is light, overall the weight will be quite heavy. Don’t worry about making the measurements perfect yet. Keep about the same measurement off of each wall to each Main “T”. Now nail some J channel around the walls only where you are hanging the first piece of grid. Why didn’t we hang the J channel around the walls first? It helps to define a correct height and makes for easy adjustment in the beginning stages of hanging the drop ceiling if we start small. Now that a good height has been establish between wall to wall and the first Main “T” has been set, it is time to hang the rest of the J channel.

Use a laser level or bubble level to make marks in each corner of each wall. Use a chalk line to snap straight lines around the walls for the J channel. Nail or screw the J channel in place. Now begin the Main “T”.

Take each Main “T” about every 4’ apart. Attach a few 4’ grid pieces in between the Main “T” sections as you work along. This will help keep each Main “T” at the correct   distance apart as you work from Main “T” to Main “T”. Once the Main “T” sections are complete, its time to move on to the next step.

Snap into place each 4’ grid section both vertically and horizontally. It makes the work go faster if you and you partner work towards each other from opposite ends of the room. Once all of the 4’ grid sections are in place, its time to assemble the 2’ sections.

The 2’ grid sections go between each 4’ section and probably around the walls depending upon your measurements of the room. Use tin snips to cut each of the 2’ grid sections as needed. Once all of the 2’ grid sections are in place and the grid is complete, it’s time to move on to the acoustic ceiling tiles.

Once the grid is done, your halfway home! Place each tile in the grid by rotating each acoustic ceiling tile diagonal through each grids 2’ x 2’ square. Once the tile is clear above the grid, lay the tile flat and set it in place. Cut the tiles as needed with a utility knife. Make sure you cut the tiles about 1/8 short to allow for room when you set the tiles. The acoustic ceiling tiles can be damaged very easily so you need to be careful about jamming tiles in that are to tight. With extra caution and patience you can finish your own acoustic drop ceiling in no time at all!

More Helpful Handyman Hints

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