Old barn wood Waste as a Way of Life

Old barn wood Waste as a Way of Life

BETTER BARN

Changes are taking place in the barn.  The second floor is getting fancy.  We are going to have walls.  Glenn has his portable infinity wall when he photographs his sculptures down to a science, but as always, I struggle.  My sculptures are essentially 2-D and they hang on a wall.  The only wall currently big enough is in the bedroom.

And although the parallel shadows add context when photographing a piece, they are probably distracting.  Smooth walls would be such a help.  This bedroom wall used to be the outside of the house.

Looking up from the ground level, the ceiling and walls are going up.  This side of the space will remain open, as will the corresponding back, and Glenn will make custom railings for here.

This is a view to the front of the barn from the second floor.  I have never seen gray-green sheetrock before.  It contains a moisture barrier.  Love the linear structure of the studs in building.  Often finished houses seem far less interesting to me than when they are a complex armature.  Didnt want a ceiling in the gallery space, but Glenn covered my rock with his paper.  Hes probably right.  It would be messy without a ceiling.

The railing that Glenn has been saving for years will switch from left to right, and of course he will modify it to be more artful.  All of our bicycles hang from the first floor ceiling and define spaces in an interesting kind of way.

Now the sheet rock guys are moving on to the unfinished bathroom.

USING OLD DOORS

The new master bedroom was designed around many accessories we already had:  the urinal which became a sink, old tile, old windows, and finally sets of old doors.  The whole house has a sense of age to it.  It is not shabby chic (hate that term), but the house retains and shows its history.  Good thing this aesthetic is fine with me, one who wants to use only things that have  already been used before, whether for their original purpose or not.

The cracks and peeling paint will be saved with application of a thick coat of something.  In its current position, the old paint is fairly fixed.  The darker doors will also receive a coat to shine them up and protect them.  The minute my husband drug out these doors last year, it was my intention to put the glider below in the new room because of the simpatico texture.  I am not at this point sure there will be room for the glider.  It would be beautiful.

These doors have been in the big house all their lives.  They retain their original colors and open to a big closet in the dressing room.  The bedrooms they protected no longer exist.

Going around the corner from the sets of closet doors, there is a door made by us for the private commode.  Glenn made it from wood he used and acquired for his former homestead.

See those lights on the ceiling?  We bought seven for a dollar apiece at our local flea.  Used all of them in this addition.

Above is the inside of the door with its beautiful patterning.  The old door knob works, and locks!

MOVING FORWARD

Around here, when it rains, we feel like prisoners.  We have had rain all afternoon, and it slows us down.  Hate to say that with all of the Midwest shriveling up like a dry orange peel.  We have to keep busy inside.

Warmer colors are starting to creep into the decking around the pool.  I am thrilled to see space on shelving where tile used to be.

Below is a urinal/sink that Glenn found in a ditch years ago.  We have been using it for pansies and creeping things outside in a garden.  The flowers are elsewhere now as this urinal is going into the master bath as a sink.  The particular hardware for this thing cost six hundred dollars.  Still below our allowance for the cost quotation.

Glenn says these have always had split personalities.  He has run into them as sinks as often as urinals.

Here is the sink waiting for installation.  Glenn has made a shelf to stand behind the top of the sink out of old barn wood, highly polished with polyurethane .  It has to be installed first.    Shelving will be custom made for under the sink.

The aged barn wood is from an old barn on Glenns former acreage in Missouri,  knocked down about two years ago.   We brought the wood  here to infuse this place with Glenns  history.  Below is a detail of the door he made for the enclosed commode area which will be just to the right of the sink area.   It still retains on the inside patterning from old paint and use.

So the old barn wood will be used in three places, the sink area, the commode area, and a strip will line the perimeter of the shower/commode/sink cluster at the top, at eight feet.  The ceiling is contoured to the design of the outside roof.

Below is another instance of old wood that will be in the new bedroom/bath:  the old pine siding from 1939.  You can also see a part of the contour of the ceiling.  Dont know yet about paint color (or maybe sanding and poly) for that sided area.   Any opinions?

BETTER BARN

Changes are taking place in the barn.  The second floor is getting fancy.  We are going to have walls.  Glenn has his portable infinity wall when he photographs his sculptures down to a science, but as always, I struggle.  My sculptures are essentially 2-D and they hang on a wall.  The only wall currently big enough is in the bedroom.

And although the parallel shadows add context when photographing a piece, they are probably distracting.  Smooth walls would be such a help.  This bedroom wall used to be the outside of the house.

Looking up from the ground level, the ceiling and walls are going up.  This side of the space will remain open, as will the corresponding back, and Glenn will make custom railings for here.

This is a view to the front of the barn from the second floor.  I have never seen gray-green sheetrock before.  It contains a moisture barrier.  Love the linear structure of the studs in building.  Often finished houses seem far less interesting to me than when they are a complex armature.  Didnt want a ceiling in the gallery space, but Glenn covered my rock with his paper.  Hes probably right.  It would be messy without a ceiling.

The railing that Glenn has been saving for years will switch from left to right, and of course he will modify it to be more artful.  All of our bicycles hang from the first floor ceiling and define spaces in an interesting kind of way.

Now the sheet rock guys are moving on to the unfinished bathroom.

USING OLD DOORS

Old barn wood Waste as a Way of Life

The new master bedroom was designed around many accessories we already had:  the urinal which became a sink, old tile, old windows, and finally sets of old doors.  The whole house has a sense of age to it.  It is not shabby chic (hate that term), but the house retains and shows its history.  Good thing this aesthetic is fine with me, one who wants to use only things that have  already been used before, whether for their original purpose or not.

The cracks and peeling paint will be saved with application of a thick coat of something.  In its current position, the old paint is fairly fixed.  The darker doors will also receive a coat to shine them up and protect them.  The minute my husband drug out these doors last year, it was my intention to put the glider below in the new room because of the simpatico texture.  I am not at this point sure there will be room for the glider.  It would be beautiful.

These doors have been in the big house all their lives.  They retain their original colors and open to a big closet in the dressing room.  The bedrooms they protected no longer exist.

Going around the corner from the sets of closet doors, there is a door made by us for the private commode.  Glenn made it from wood he used and acquired for his former homestead.

See those lights on the ceiling?  We bought seven for a dollar apiece at our local flea.  Used all of them in this addition.

Above is the inside of the door with its beautiful patterning.  The old door knob works, and locks!

MOVING FORWARD

Around here, when it rains, we feel like prisoners.  We have had rain all afternoon, and it slows us down.  Hate to say that with all of the Midwest shriveling up like a dry orange peel.  We have to keep busy inside.

Warmer colors are starting to creep into the decking around the pool.  I am thrilled to see space on shelving where tile used to be.

Below is a urinal/sink that Glenn found in a ditch years ago.  We have been using it for pansies and creeping things outside in a garden.  The flowers are elsewhere now as this urinal is going into the master bath as a sink.  The particular hardware for this thing cost six hundred dollars.  Still below our allowance for the cost quotation.

Glenn says these have always had split personalities.  He has run into them as sinks as often as urinals.

Here is the sink waiting for installation.  Glenn has made a shelf to stand behind the top of the sink out of old barn wood, highly polished with polyurethane .  It has to be installed first.    Shelving will be custom made for under the sink.

The aged barn wood is from an old barn on Glenns former acreage in Missouri,  knocked down about two years ago.   We brought the wood  here to infuse this place with Glenns  history.  Below is a detail of the door he made for the enclosed commode area which will be just to the right of the sink area.   It still retains on the inside patterning from old paint and use.

So the old barn wood will be used in three places, the sink area, the commode area, and a strip will line the perimeter of the shower/commode/sink cluster at the top, at eight feet.  The ceiling is contoured to the design of the outside roof.

Below is another instance of old wood that will be in the new bedroom/bath:  the old pine siding from 1939.  You can also see a part of the contour of the ceiling.  Dont know yet about paint color (or maybe sanding and poly) for that sided area.   Any opinions?


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