Askjake August 2006

Categories

Knotty pine ceiling

We are remodeling and would like to use knotty pine on the ceiling. We currently have the popcorn texture on the ceiling. We have heard that we need to remove the popcorn texture and install a vapor barrier and then install the ceiling — is this correct? We want to eliminate costly mistakes.

Karin V.

Karen,

It is a good idea to remove the texture so you have a smoother surface to install the knotty pine over. If the ceiling has not been painted, it should remove fairly easily. Wet it down a little bit with a mister to speed up the process and to cut down on dust. If it has been painted, it may not come off as easily, but it should remove enough to allow for a smoother surface.

I don’t think you need to worry about a vapor barrier, assuming you have one above the drywall in either kraft faced insulation or a plastic sheeting.

Regarding the knotty pine, you should refinish it if possible. The boards will expand and contract and the joints will open and close and show the unfinished edges.

Good luck and good remodeling!

Jake

Converting a 3 Season room

Would it be costly to turn our three season porch into a four season porch?

Kathy

Kathy,

That all depends. There are a whole lot of factors to consider. The biggest being the heating and cooling of the room and trying to keep that high dollar energy trapped inside. This really boils down to the quality of insulation in the floor, walls and ceiling. Take a look at the quality of your doors and windows as well. If these items can match the building code requirements for your area without costing you and arm and a leg, I would say go for it. Contact a reputable remodeling company in your area to help assess your current situation. Go to www.nari.org for help in finding a good company in your area. Best of luck to you! Jake

Posted by Jake Schloegel at 03:36 PM | Permalink | TrackBack

Old wood

Bryan

That’s a very good question and one that I am not real comfortable in answering. I do not have a lot of experience in working with that type of wood. I have worked around some knotty pine and when doing so, we shellaced the knots to keep them from bleeding through. I suggest you take a sample of the wood to a well established paint store and ask for their advice. Good luck to you.

Smudging cabinets

My new cabinets are smudging almost like a film. These are cherry wood, and it isnt just the doors it is the whole cabinet itself.

I was told to wipe down with damp cloth and then dry with soft cloth. Within a few days. the film/smude is right back. What is this.

Kathleen,

I don’t think I am going to be able to help you with this problem. The term “natural finish” could mean a lot of things. From talking to some of the painters I use, they couldn’t really help with out knowing the exact finishing technique. One of the painters I consulted responded per the following:

“It would help to know what type of stain was used and what type of finish was used. Was this an oil stain with a lacquer top coat? What type of lacquer was used? If it was a lacquer finish was it done on a rainy or extremely humid day? The reason I ask this is because with lacquer if it is sprayed during times of extreme humidity moisture gets trapped between the finish coats and will appear milky, this can be corrected by spraying over the cabinets with a lacquer retarder which will melt the lacquer long enough for the moisture to escape.”

I would suggest you remove a door and take it to a reputable paint store and ask them for their advice.

Good luck.

Jake,

thank you for trying.

Neither the mill nor the cabinet distributor will answer the questions you posed to me. Yesterday, the cabinet distributor shared that chemicals are used in the finishing process, but refuses to discloses complete details.This remodel job will most likely end up in arbitration.

I will act on your advice. More than likely the finish was applied on a rainy day, as the cabinets were delivered at the beginning of January, and the cabinet mill is located just outside the most rainy day city; Portland, OR. The term milky, describes the current wood appearance.

It’s definitely something like you describe. I forgot that the contractor left an extra Lazy Susan panel in my garage. Last Friday I took a look at it. The “milky appearance” is on this panel too.

I wish your business was located in CA! My nonprofit organization has an extensive list of advocates, some who live in MO. I will share your excellent business reputation.

Categories

Knotty pine ceiling

We are remodeling and would like to use knotty pine on the ceiling. We currently have the popcorn texture on the ceiling. We have heard that we need to remove the popcorn texture and install a vapor barrier and then install the ceiling — is this correct? We want to eliminate costly mistakes.

Karin V.

Karen,

It is a good idea to remove the texture so you have a smoother surface to install the knotty pine over. If the ceiling has not been painted, it should remove fairly easily. Wet it down a little bit with a mister to speed up the process and to cut down on dust. If it has been painted, it may not come off as easily, but it should remove enough to allow for a smoother surface.

I don’t think you need to worry about a vapor barrier, assuming you have one above the drywall in either kraft faced insulation or a plastic sheeting.

Regarding the knotty pine, you should refinish it if possible. The boards will expand and contract and the joints will open and close and show the unfinished edges.

Good luck and good remodeling!

Jake

Converting a 3 Season room

Would it be costly to turn our three season porch into a four season porch?

Kathy

Kathy,

That all depends. There are a whole lot of factors to consider. The biggest being the heating and cooling of the room and trying to keep that high dollar energy trapped inside. This really boils down to the quality of insulation in the floor, walls and ceiling. Take a look at the quality of your doors and windows as well. If these items can match the building code requirements for your area without costing you and arm and a leg, I would say go for it. Contact a reputable remodeling company in your area to help assess your current situation. Go to www.nari.org for help in finding a good company in your area. Best of luck to you! Jake

Posted by Jake Schloegel at 03:36 PM | Permalink | TrackBack

Old wood

Bryan

That’s a very good question and one that I am not real comfortable in answering. I do not have a lot of experience in working with that type of wood. I have worked around some knotty pine and when doing so, we shellaced the knots to keep them from bleeding through. I suggest you take a sample of the wood to a well established paint store and ask for their advice. Good luck to you.

Smudging cabinets

My new cabinets are smudging almost like a film. These are cherry wood, and it isnt just the doors it is the whole cabinet itself.

I was told to wipe down with damp cloth and then dry with soft cloth. Within a few days. the film/smude is right back. What is this.

Kathleen,

I don’t think I am going to be able to help you with this problem. The term “natural finish” could mean a lot of things. From talking to some of the painters I use, they couldn’t really help with out knowing the exact finishing technique. One of the painters I consulted responded per the following:

“It would help to know what type of stain was used and what type of finish was used. Was this an oil stain with a lacquer top coat? What type of lacquer was used? If it was a lacquer finish was it done on a rainy or extremely humid day? The reason I ask this is because with lacquer if it is sprayed during times of extreme humidity moisture gets trapped between the finish coats and will appear milky, this can be corrected by spraying over the cabinets with a lacquer retarder which will melt the lacquer long enough for the moisture to escape.”

I would suggest you remove a door and take it to a reputable paint store and ask them for their advice.

Good luck.

Jake,

thank you for trying.

Neither the mill nor the cabinet distributor will answer the questions you posed to me. Yesterday, the cabinet distributor shared that chemicals are used in the finishing process, but refuses to discloses complete details.This remodel job will most likely end up in arbitration.

I will act on your advice. More than likely the finish was applied on a rainy day, as the cabinets were delivered at the beginning of January, and the cabinet mill is located just outside the most rainy day city; Portland, OR. The term milky, describes the current wood appearance.

It’s definitely something like you describe. I forgot that the contractor left an extra Lazy Susan panel in my garage. Last Friday I took a look at it. The “milky appearance” is on this panel too.

I wish your business was located in CA! My nonprofit organization has an extensive list of advocates, some who live in MO. I will share your excellent business reputation.


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