The cost of soundproofing a property

The cost of soundproofing a property

The cost of soundproofing a property

The cost of soundproofing a property can be quite expensive; however, there are a few ways you can keep the sound out and the cost down.

Keep your home quiet and

peaceful by installing

soundproofing

Soundproofing a property involves working on two main areas, the floors and the walls:

Soundproofing floors

Building regulations now demand that you address sound problems that may occur when building an intermediate floor. No matter what material you choose to build this intermediate floor from timber or masonry some changes may be needed in order to boost soundproofing. You will have to pack some insulation into the floor void as well as use a ceiling board which is a bit heavier and thicker than the normal standard, weighing at least 10kg/metre squared. As for the insulation, this needs to be around 100mm thick to be effective. Making these few changes should provide you with a decibel (dB) reduction of around 40dB, which is higher than the 35dB you would get if you didnt make those changes.

That is one of the basic things that can be done to improve soundproofing; however there are a few other options which can help you in the fight against noise:

  • Make sure you have a good carpet and thick underlay on the floor above, this will help reduce noise as well as impact.
  • If you have decided you want a hard floor surface above, then you can purchase a special underlay which should help kill off any excess noise.
  • There is the option of having a floating floor installed. Some can add around 5dB to the overall decibel reduction. Though bear in mind they will add around 50mm to your floor depth.
  • Another idea is to use resilient bars attached to the underside of the joints. This will separate the ceiling board from the floor and this isolation will be great for soundproofing. The easiest way of building in this isolation into the floor is to separate the ceiling joists from the floor joists.

Soundproofing walls

Wall are a bit more straightforward to soundproof than floors, however the guidelines required by building regulations are not very demanding and you may wish to do a bit more to soundproof your home. Building regulations stipulate that if you have masonry walls then you will have to plaster them. If they are made of timber or steel studs, then you will be required to either double-board each face or alternatively, place mineral wool within the wall, and then finish the wall with a 10kg/metre squared board.

However much like floors, there is a bit more you can do to the stud walls in order to maximise soundproofing:

  • You could opt for fermacell board rather than plaster. Fermacell is far heavier and requires little finishing compared to a normal stud wall.
  • If you are still at the design stage then you could consider building bedrooms with built in fitted cupboards between diving walls. This will not only provide you with storage but also act as a great noise buffer.
  • Doors are often a big source of noise. If youre really serious about soundproofing and dont mind the cost, then you could fit an acoustic door.

How much does soundproofing cost?

A few of the soundproofing ideas mentioned above can be implemented for free, as long as they are built into your design plans. Other extras will depend on where you live, it is best to talk to your builder or soundproofing professional about the costs involved as he or she may be able to advise you on the best options for your particular home as well as point you in the right direction of where the best deals are.

Get free soundproofing quotes here

The cost of soundproofing a property

The cost of soundproofing a property can be quite expensive; however, there are a few ways you can keep the sound out and the cost down.

Keep your home quiet and

peaceful by installing

soundproofing

Soundproofing a property involves working on two main areas, the floors and the walls:

Soundproofing floors

Building regulations now demand that you address sound problems that may occur when building an intermediate floor. No matter what material you choose to build this intermediate floor from timber or masonry some changes may be needed in order to boost soundproofing. You will have to pack some insulation into the floor void as well as use a ceiling board which is a bit heavier and thicker than the normal standard, weighing at least 10kg/metre squared. As for the insulation, this needs to be around 100mm thick to be effective. Making these few changes should provide you with a decibel (dB) reduction of around 40dB, which is higher than the 35dB you would get if you didnt make those changes.

That is one of the basic things that can be done to improve soundproofing; however there are a few other options which can help you in the fight against noise:

  • Make sure you have a good carpet and thick underlay on the floor above, this will help reduce noise as well as impact.
  • If you have decided you want a hard floor surface above, then you can purchase a special underlay which should help kill off any excess noise.
  • There is the option of having a floating floor installed. Some can add around 5dB to the overall decibel reduction. Though bear in mind they will add around 50mm to your floor depth.
  • Another idea is to use resilient bars attached to the underside of the joints. This will separate the ceiling board from the floor and this isolation will be great for soundproofing. The easiest way of building in this isolation into the floor is to separate the ceiling joists from the floor joists.

Soundproofing walls

Wall are a bit more straightforward to soundproof than floors, however the guidelines required by building regulations are not very demanding and you may wish to do a bit more to soundproof your home. Building regulations stipulate that if you have masonry walls then you will have to plaster them. If they are made of timber or steel studs, then you will be required to either double-board each face or alternatively, place mineral wool within the wall, and then finish the wall with a 10kg/metre squared board.

However much like floors, there is a bit more you can do to the stud walls in order to maximise soundproofing:

  • You could opt for fermacell board rather than plaster. Fermacell is far heavier and requires little finishing compared to a normal stud wall.
  • If you are still at the design stage then you could consider building bedrooms with built in fitted cupboards between diving walls. This will not only provide you with storage but also act as a great noise buffer.
  • Doors are often a big source of noise. If youre really serious about soundproofing and dont mind the cost, then you could fit an acoustic door.

How much does soundproofing cost?

A few of the soundproofing ideas mentioned above can be implemented for free, as long as they are built into your design plans. Other extras will depend on where you live, it is best to talk to your builder or soundproofing professional about the costs involved as he or she may be able to advise you on the best options for your particular home as well as point you in the right direction of where the best deals are.

Get free soundproofing quotes here


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