How to Install Crown Molding eBay

How to Install Crown Molding eBay

How to Install Crown Molding

Installing crown molding in a home is always a good decision. No other remodeling project that makes a home look more elegant can be done as inexpensively and easily as installing crown molding. In addition, crown molding adds more to the home’s resale value than it costs to install.

Although installing crown molding is a bit of a challenge, it is something that a person with average carpentry skills can learn to do. The hardest part of installing crown molding is cutting it, which is discussed in a separate buyer’s guide.

Installation Styles

Contents

Painted or Stained Crown Molding?

Crown molding can either be installed painted or stained and varnished. Of the two, painted crown molding is by far the more common. White painted molding against a colored wall stands out and looks elegant.

The decision to use painted or stained crown molding depends upon the rest of the molding in the home. If a home already has painted baseboards and casings, it makes no sense to install stained and varnished crown. However, if the baseboards and casings are already stained and varnished, then 1) the crown should be stained and varnished, or 2) he rest of the molding should be painted. No matter what, all the molding needs to match.

However, there is one exception to the match rule. It is common to install stained and varnished molding in the living areas, yet to install painted molding in the bedrooms. It is also common to install crown molding only in the living area and/or the hallway, leaving the bedrooms without crown molding. When these sorts of design decisions are made, it is important to do them in a way that indicates a clear, logical pattern.

Crown Molding Material Choices

If the decision is made to stain and varnish the molding, then the material purchased must be stainable. A lot of crown molding is sold pre-primed white, to make the installation process easier. Since stain can’t be applied over the primer, this type of crown molding is unsuitable for a stain-and-varnish project.

Some crown molding is made of urethane foam. This is installed just like wood molding, but is considerably cheaper. Urethane moldings always come finished white. They cannot be stained, and must be painted.

Some wood moldings are finger jointed. This is a means of saving materials, ultimately lowering the per-foot price of the molding. Finger jointed moldings have joints along the stick of molding, where smaller pieces have been glued together. These joints look like a zig-zag cut, creating a number of fingers which interlace with each other. Finger jointed molding is intended to be painted. Although it is physically possible to stain it, the joints make this difficult and unattractive.

Mitered or Block Corners?

There are two basic styles of crown molding installations. The most common is to use mitered corners. Actually, they aren’t mitered, but only look as if they are. The second method is to use corner blocks. This method is actually considerably easier, yet looks more expensive.

What makes the corner block method easier is that the blocks eliminate the need to cut mitered corners and to cope the molding. This saves a lot of time and a lot of scrap molding, which could otherwise be wasted by making wrong cuts. However, it is a little more expensive, as the corner blocks need to be purchased separately.

Preparing to Install Crown Molding

Before installing crown molding, it is a good idea to pre-finish it. For painted molding, this means applying primer and one finish coat. For stained molding, this means completing the stain and applying one coat of varnish. In both cases, the final coat still needs to be applied after installation.

The advantage of pre-finishing the molding is that it saves time. It’s much easier to finish molding while it is resting on a couple of sawhorses. than it is to finish installed molding. By pre-finishing, only the final finish coat needs to be applied in place. This also reduces the chance of drips and spills.

If the ceiling is textured with acoustic popcorn finish, then it is a good idea to remove the texture where the molding is to be located. This lets the molding sit flush against the ceiling. Failure to remove the texture leaves a small gap between the crown molding and the ceiling, which will need to be caulked.

To determine how much texture needs to be removed, place a small piece of crown molding in a corner of the room, as if you were installing it where the walls meet. Measure the distance from the corner to the edge of the molding. This is the amount of popcorn which must be removed from the ceiling.

Popcorn texture is easily removed by scraping with a putty knife. This is a messy process. It is a good idea to spread drop cloths under the work area to catch the falling texture and drywall mud. Be careful not to remove too wide a swath, or you will see a gap when the crown molding is installed.

The easiest way to make sure that the right amount of texture is removed is to make a cardboard gauge. Take a side of a cardboard box and cut out a rectangle along a long edge, the depth of which matches the amount of texture that must be removed. Leave a couple of tabs on the ends of this cutout. It can then be placed on the ceiling, with the tabs touching the wall. The texture within the cutout is what needs to be removed.

It is not a good idea to use a chalk line to mark the area where texture needs to be removed, as that leaves a line that must later be painted over. In the process of painting the ceiling, a lot of popcorn texture can fall off.

Installing the Crown Molding — Mitered Corners

Crown molding must be nailed to both the wall and ceiling. As the majority of this space is only drywall, without any backing to nail into, it is important to locate the wall studs and ceiling joists before starting. These are normally both installed on 16-inch centers, although in some homes they are installed on 12-inch or 24-inch centers. You can find them using a stud finder. an ultrasonic tool for measuring material thickness. When you pass the device over a stud or joist, a light illuminates on the stud finder.

Installing the First Piece of Crown Molding

The back of the crown molding is cut to provide two flat surfaces at ninety degrees to each other. The space between these two surfaces will probably be cut at a 45 degree angle. The two flat surfaces must sit snugly against the wall and ceiling. To determine which one goes on the ceiling (or, in other words, which way is up), look at the molding profile. The more complicated part of the profile goes down, against the wall.

It is best to start installing the crown molding on the longest wall in the room. If the entryway is in one of the longest walls, then choose the longest wall opposite the entryway. If both corners are inside corners, then this piece will need to be run from corner to corner, cutting both corners at 90 degree angles.

Nail the crown molding to the wall and ceiling with a pneumatic finishing nailer and 2- inch finishing nails. While it is possible to nail crown molding in place by hand, it is extremely difficult. The working angles are not conducive to nailing easily and any slips of the hammer can mar the wood. The air pressure and depth adjustment (if any) of the pneumatic finishing nailer should be set so that the heads of the finishing nails are about one-sixteenth of an inch below the surface of the wood. Using a nail set and hammer. sink any that stick out above that level deeper into the wood.

Installing Subsequent Pieces of Crown Molding

Once the first piece of molding is installed, the molding should be cut and installed working around the room. This will mean that the second piece will need to be cut to contour with the first, completing the inside corner. See the buyer’s guide on How to Cut Crown Molding for an explanation of how to do this.

Always work around the room and not haphazardly. While it may seem like a good idea to put in both long pieces first, then cut the end piece to fit, it is almost impossible to contour both ends of a piece of crown molding so that they fit tightly into the corners. However, cutting a piece of crown where one end is contoured for the inside corner and the opposite end is mitered for an external corner is not difficult.

Installing the Crown Molding — Block Corners

When installing crown molding with block corners, the blocks need to be installed first. There are different blocks manufactured for internal and external corners. Since corners of rooms are always framed to have studs on both sides of the corner, these blocks can be nailed directly into those studs with 2-inch finishing nails. However, they will have to be toe nailed (nailed at an angle) due to the thickness of the block. It is not necessary to nail them to the ceiling, as they are nailed into two walls. It is best to use a pneumatic finishing nailer for this.

Once the blocks are in place, the crown molding can be installed. Since there is no need to miter the corners, all the end cuts are at 90 degrees, making the job much simpler. In this case, it is not necessary to work around the room, as each piece of crown molding is butting up against blocks at both ends. Instead, start with the longest pieces first, to help ensure that pieces don’t need to be joined together for the long sides.

Installing Crown Molding Over Brick or Stone

Installing crown molding over brick or stone requires special support for the molding, as it cannot be nailed into the brick or stone. Instead, a wood block, running the length of the molding, needs to be nailed to the wall. This can be ripped (cut lengthwise) on a table saw from standard two-by-two dimensional lumber. The cut needs to be made at a 45 degree angle, to match the back of the crown molding.

To gauge the cut, make a trial cut on a piece of scrap. Then place that in an inside corner of the room, with a small piece of crown molding scrap over it. As long as both of the flat mounting surfaces have contact with the walls the cut is good. There is no problem with having a slight gap between the crown molding and the support block.

Nail the support blocks to the entire length of the wall, where it meets the ceiling, wherever the brick or stone walls are. Powder actuated fasteners may have to be used for this. If so, ensure that the fastener heads are flush with the surface of the wood block. The cove molding can then be nailed to this block.

Finishing the Job

Once all the crown molding is installed all the nail holes need to be filled flush with wood putty. If there are any gaps, they will need to be filled with a small bead of caulking. If the crown molding is going to be painted and stained, caulking can only be applied where the molding contacts the wall or ceiling, not in the corners.

Once the putty and caulking has had adequate time to dry, the last coat of paint or varnish can be applied. If varnishing, it is a good idea to go over the molding lightly by hand with fine sandpaper (220 or 330 grit) to remove any bumps caused by dust getting into the finish.

Buying Crown Molding on eBay

Crown molding. along with all the other materials and tools required for this project are available on eBay. A search for crown molding directly from eBay’s home page will not only return architectural crown molding results but other types of moldings as well, so this is not the best way to search for it. Instead, it is best to go to the Home Improvement sections of the Home & Garden category. Once there, select Building & Hardware. Since there is no category for Crown Molding, perform a search from that point. This will provide only the auctions that are desired.

Always be sure to buy enough crown molding to complete the job. There are many different sizes and styles of crown molding available. While most crown moldings look similar, they are not close enough to be used together. All the molding in one room will need to come from the same source to ensure that it matches.

Conclusion

Although installing crown molding is a challenging woodworking project, any handyman or do-it-yourselfer can learn how to do it successfully. This is a project that should never be undertaken without adequate time to complete it. The biggest challenge is cutting it accurately. Once cut, the actual installation is rather simple. Rushing, especially rushing the cutting, is only going to provide lots of expensive molding scraps for the scrap pile. The key to successfully installing crown molding is to take the time to think each step through, before cutting the molding.

This is a project that is definitely worth doing. Any home looks richer and more elegant with crown molding installed. The resale value increases, along with the sales appeal. Many people who don’t want to install crown molding themselves jump quickly at the opportunity to buy a home that has crown molding throughout.

How to Install Crown Molding

Installing crown molding in a home is always a good decision. No other remodeling project that makes a home look more elegant can be done as inexpensively and easily as installing crown molding. In addition, crown molding adds more to the home’s resale value than it costs to install.

Although installing crown molding is a bit of a challenge, it is something that a person with average carpentry skills can learn to do. The hardest part of installing crown molding is cutting it, which is discussed in a separate buyer’s guide.

Installation Styles

Painted or Stained Crown Molding?

Crown molding can either be installed painted or stained and varnished. Of the two, painted crown molding is by far the more common. White painted molding against a colored wall stands out and looks elegant.

The decision to use painted or stained crown molding depends upon the rest of the molding in the home. If a home already has painted baseboards and casings, it makes no sense to install stained and varnished crown. However, if the baseboards and casings are already stained and varnished, then 1) the crown should be stained and varnished, or 2) he rest of the molding should be painted. No matter what, all the molding needs to match.

However, there is one exception to the match rule. It is common to install stained and varnished molding in the living areas, yet to install painted molding in the bedrooms. It is also common to install crown molding only in the living area and/or the hallway, leaving the bedrooms without crown molding. When these sorts of design decisions are made, it is important to do them in a way that indicates a clear, logical pattern.

Crown Molding Material Choices

If the decision is made to stain and varnish the molding, then the material purchased must be stainable. A lot of crown molding is sold pre-primed white, to make the installation process easier. Since stain can’t be applied over the primer, this type of crown molding is unsuitable for a stain-and-varnish project.

Some crown molding is made of urethane foam. This is installed just like wood molding, but is considerably cheaper. Urethane moldings always come finished white. They cannot be stained, and must be painted.

Some wood moldings are finger jointed. This is a means of saving materials, ultimately lowering the per-foot price of the molding. Finger jointed moldings have joints along the stick of molding, where smaller pieces have been glued together. These joints look like a zig-zag cut, creating a number of fingers which interlace with each other. Finger jointed molding is intended to be painted. Although it is physically possible to stain it, the joints make this difficult and unattractive.

Mitered or Block Corners?

There are two basic styles of crown molding installations. The most common is to use mitered corners. Actually, they aren’t mitered, but only look as if they are. The second method is to use corner blocks. This method is actually considerably easier, yet looks more expensive.

What makes the corner block method easier is that the blocks eliminate the need to cut mitered corners and to cope the molding. This saves a lot of time and a lot of scrap molding, which could otherwise be wasted by making wrong cuts. However, it is a little more expensive, as the corner blocks need to be purchased separately.

Preparing to Install Crown Molding

How to Install Crown Molding eBay

Before installing crown molding, it is a good idea to pre-finish it. For painted molding, this means applying primer and one finish coat. For stained molding, this means completing the stain and applying one coat of varnish. In both cases, the final coat still needs to be applied after installation.

The advantage of pre-finishing the molding is that it saves time. It’s much easier to finish molding while it is resting on a couple of sawhorses. than it is to finish installed molding. By pre-finishing, only the final finish coat needs to be applied in place. This also reduces the chance of drips and spills.

If the ceiling is textured with acoustic popcorn finish, then it is a good idea to remove the texture where the molding is to be located. This lets the molding sit flush against the ceiling. Failure to remove the texture leaves a small gap between the crown molding and the ceiling, which will need to be caulked.

To determine how much texture needs to be removed, place a small piece of crown molding in a corner of the room, as if you were installing it where the walls meet. Measure the distance from the corner to the edge of the molding. This is the amount of popcorn which must be removed from the ceiling.

Popcorn texture is easily removed by scraping with a putty knife. This is a messy process. It is a good idea to spread drop cloths under the work area to catch the falling texture and drywall mud. Be careful not to remove too wide a swath, or you will see a gap when the crown molding is installed.

The easiest way to make sure that the right amount of texture is removed is to make a cardboard gauge. Take a side of a cardboard box and cut out a rectangle along a long edge, the depth of which matches the amount of texture that must be removed. Leave a couple of tabs on the ends of this cutout. It can then be placed on the ceiling, with the tabs touching the wall. The texture within the cutout is what needs to be removed.

It is not a good idea to use a chalk line to mark the area where texture needs to be removed, as that leaves a line that must later be painted over. In the process of painting the ceiling, a lot of popcorn texture can fall off.

Installing the Crown Molding — Mitered Corners

Crown molding must be nailed to both the wall and ceiling. As the majority of this space is only drywall, without any backing to nail into, it is important to locate the wall studs and ceiling joists before starting. These are normally both installed on 16-inch centers, although in some homes they are installed on 12-inch or 24-inch centers. You can find them using a stud finder. an ultrasonic tool for measuring material thickness. When you pass the device over a stud or joist, a light illuminates on the stud finder.

Installing the First Piece of Crown Molding

The back of the crown molding is cut to provide two flat surfaces at ninety degrees to each other. The space between these two surfaces will probably be cut at a 45 degree angle. The two flat surfaces must sit snugly against the wall and ceiling. To determine which one goes on the ceiling (or, in other words, which way is up), look at the molding profile. The more complicated part of the profile goes down, against the wall.

It is best to start installing the crown molding on the longest wall in the room. If the entryway is in one of the longest walls, then choose the longest wall opposite the entryway. If both corners are inside corners, then this piece will need to be run from corner to corner, cutting both corners at 90 degree angles.

Nail the crown molding to the wall and ceiling with a pneumatic finishing nailer and 2- inch finishing nails. While it is possible to nail crown molding in place by hand, it is extremely difficult. The working angles are not conducive to nailing easily and any slips of the hammer can mar the wood. The air pressure and depth adjustment (if any) of the pneumatic finishing nailer should be set so that the heads of the finishing nails are about one-sixteenth of an inch below the surface of the wood. Using a nail set and hammer. sink any that stick out above that level deeper into the wood.

Installing Subsequent Pieces of Crown Molding

Once the first piece of molding is installed, the molding should be cut and installed working around the room. This will mean that the second piece will need to be cut to contour with the first, completing the inside corner. See the buyer’s guide on How to Cut Crown Molding for an explanation of how to do this.

Always work around the room and not haphazardly. While it may seem like a good idea to put in both long pieces first, then cut the end piece to fit, it is almost impossible to contour both ends of a piece of crown molding so that they fit tightly into the corners. However, cutting a piece of crown where one end is contoured for the inside corner and the opposite end is mitered for an external corner is not difficult.

Installing the Crown Molding — Block Corners

When installing crown molding with block corners, the blocks need to be installed first. There are different blocks manufactured for internal and external corners. Since corners of rooms are always framed to have studs on both sides of the corner, these blocks can be nailed directly into those studs with 2-inch finishing nails. However, they will have to be toe nailed (nailed at an angle) due to the thickness of the block. It is not necessary to nail them to the ceiling, as they are nailed into two walls. It is best to use a pneumatic finishing nailer for this.

Once the blocks are in place, the crown molding can be installed. Since there is no need to miter the corners, all the end cuts are at 90 degrees, making the job much simpler. In this case, it is not necessary to work around the room, as each piece of crown molding is butting up against blocks at both ends. Instead, start with the longest pieces first, to help ensure that pieces don’t need to be joined together for the long sides.

Installing Crown Molding Over Brick or Stone

Installing crown molding over brick or stone requires special support for the molding, as it cannot be nailed into the brick or stone. Instead, a wood block, running the length of the molding, needs to be nailed to the wall. This can be ripped (cut lengthwise) on a table saw from standard two-by-two dimensional lumber. The cut needs to be made at a 45 degree angle, to match the back of the crown molding.

To gauge the cut, make a trial cut on a piece of scrap. Then place that in an inside corner of the room, with a small piece of crown molding scrap over it. As long as both of the flat mounting surfaces have contact with the walls the cut is good. There is no problem with having a slight gap between the crown molding and the support block.

Nail the support blocks to the entire length of the wall, where it meets the ceiling, wherever the brick or stone walls are. Powder actuated fasteners may have to be used for this. If so, ensure that the fastener heads are flush with the surface of the wood block. The cove molding can then be nailed to this block.

Finishing the Job

Once all the crown molding is installed all the nail holes need to be filled flush with wood putty. If there are any gaps, they will need to be filled with a small bead of caulking. If the crown molding is going to be painted and stained, caulking can only be applied where the molding contacts the wall or ceiling, not in the corners.

Once the putty and caulking has had adequate time to dry, the last coat of paint or varnish can be applied. If varnishing, it is a good idea to go over the molding lightly by hand with fine sandpaper (220 or 330 grit) to remove any bumps caused by dust getting into the finish.

Buying Crown Molding on eBay

Crown molding. along with all the other materials and tools required for this project are available on eBay. A search for crown molding directly from eBay’s home page will not only return architectural crown molding results but other types of moldings as well, so this is not the best way to search for it. Instead, it is best to go to the Home Improvement sections of the Home & Garden category. Once there, select Building & Hardware. Since there is no category for Crown Molding, perform a search from that point. This will provide only the auctions that are desired.

Always be sure to buy enough crown molding to complete the job. There are many different sizes and styles of crown molding available. While most crown moldings look similar, they are not close enough to be used together. All the molding in one room will need to come from the same source to ensure that it matches.

Conclusion

Although installing crown molding is a challenging woodworking project, any handyman or do-it-yourselfer can learn how to do it successfully. This is a project that should never be undertaken without adequate time to complete it. The biggest challenge is cutting it accurately. Once cut, the actual installation is rather simple. Rushing, especially rushing the cutting, is only going to provide lots of expensive molding scraps for the scrap pile. The key to successfully installing crown molding is to take the time to think each step through, before cutting the molding.

This is a project that is definitely worth doing. Any home looks richer and more elegant with crown molding installed. The resale value increases, along with the sales appeal. Many people who don’t want to install crown molding themselves jump quickly at the opportunity to buy a home that has crown molding throughout.


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