Simple sophisticated ceiling detailing creates stunning effect — Naples Daily News

Simple sophisticated ceiling detailing creates stunning effect - Naples Daily News

Simple sophisticated ceiling detailing creates stunning effect

BONITA SPRINGS — Now more than ever, there’s a reason to look up. To balance today’s popular trend of simple, clean-lined furniture and minimal accessories, interior designers and builders are turning to the ceiling, often called the «fifth wall,» to add artistic flair — everything from beams and dramatically lit coves to metallic finishes and grass cloth.

«Furniture has gotten simple; it’s not as ornate or as carved as it has been in the past,» said Janice Maskell, a designer with Robb & Stucky Interiors. «Ceiling details become important to add other architectural elements or texture to a room to make it interesting.»

Southwest Florida’s ceilings, which once rivaled those of mansions in Newport, R.I. with intricate groin vaults and elaborate murals and at times approached the level of the Sistine Chapel, are taking their cues from a general national trend to simplify — a movement that’s seeped into other industries, said Maskell. «Look at the new Bentleys and Jaguars, they’re simpler than they have been in the past,» she said. «Design, in general, is more simplified, too; designs are pulling back.»

Blame it on the economy or the cyclical nature of design, but ceilings are reflecting that trend, as well. «It’s not that the furniture is less expensive or less elegant,» Maskell said. «It’s just different.»

Simple ceiling treatments like beams with grass cloth inserts have become a new go to design statement, achieving both visual interest and texture. «It also adds a dimensional aspect,» said Maskell, who used beams in the great room and dining room ceilings of Residence 403, a three-bedroom, three-bath model in the new Tavira high-rise, The Lutgert Companies’ sixth luxury tower at Bonita Bay. The darkness of the wood-hued beams contrasts with the light furniture below, creating drama for the eye.

Maskell introduced the dark wood tones in the foyer’s tray ceiling, adding four wood-hued squares that reveal a hint of the lighter surface between and also anchor a gold lighting fixture. The light-and-dark contrast is heightened with wood crown molding around the perimeter of the tray.

Ceilings, said Maskell, also can set the design tone for a room. «There are three new models in Tavira, and each has a different feeling because of the ceilings,» she said. «One has a more traditional look. Another has what I call a South Hamptons look; it has light beadboard with a whitewash. It works well with the style of furniture that is in right now.»

Maskell said wood is making a big comeback in ceiling design, also appearing as tongue-and-groove pecky cypress and beadboard paneling for a coastal island look. Crown molding that floats across the ceiling surface now hides cove lighting, an effect Maskell said «adds drama and a soft glow. People love it for entertaining, and it’s the perfect ambience for a cocktail party.»

Designers also are using paint, applied moldings, stenciling and beadboard cladding to embellish these surfaces. In recent years ceilings also have boasted custom-applied tissue paper and a wall covering that emulates the look of pressed tin. Murals have become passé, said Maskell. «No one seems to want the Venetian or traditional look. They want a transitional or contemporary design.»

The combination of beams and grass cloth is a design element interior designer Kathleen Scanlan, of Kathleen Scanlan Interiors, uses to bring «texture and warmth to a room.» Scanlan used the technique in the great room of the Sienna, Divco Construction Corp.’s first model home in Grand Arbors at TwinEagles, the 1,115-acre Naples community being developed by Bonita Bay Group. The custom single-family home, in the Hedgestone neighborhood, also has grass cloth within the coffers of the dining room ceiling.

«Today’s taller ceilings require elements to tone them down,» said Scanlan, who achieved that goal with two different paint values in the Sienna’s study.

Scanlan, who has worked with Divco for a dozen years, also sees a shift in the once popular Old World and more ornate features of previous homes. Today’s model homes, she says, are designed to reflect a more casual aesthetic, one that appeals to a younger clientele who favors more modern transitional design. «They want a more casual home, so we’re downplaying the formality that homes here used to have,» she said. «It really depends on the home and the height of the ceilings, but in general there has been a trend to less formal homes.»

Ceiling details are generally introduced in the foyer and found in the home’s more formal areas — dining and living rooms — and the rooms used most frequently by the owner, including the family room and master suite. The groin-vaulted foyer ceiling of The Newport Company’s Valtalena model in Mediterra has a painted trompe l’oeil effect that’s also carried into the custom single-family home’s dining room and hallways.

«Our faux-finishing team painted the ceiling to look like real stone bricks,» said Luisa Shafran, the principal of award-winning Landmark Design. «It creates a really interesting entry feature.»

The eye-tricking stone-and-block look continues into the groin vault of the adjoining gallery, which separates the living room and foyer, and is repeated in the dining room’s angled tray ceiling and an adjoining vestibule. Most of the ceilings throughout the four-bedroom model’s 5,800 square feet of air-conditioned living space have coffered or tray ceilings with thick crown molding. The living room’s 17-foot ceiling also has a subtle Greek key stencil encircling its perimeter.

Shafran added visual interest in the master bedroom and bath ceilings with subtle-colored Venetian plaster walls. The perimeter of the bathroom ceiling and the coffer in the master bedroom are stenciled with a gentle leaf motif.

A different trompe l’oeil effect was used in the family room ceiling — paint recreates the look of a real bamboo border that frames basket-weave detailing. Bamboo shoots reappear in the pool bath.

Shafran says the painted ceilings contrast the lighter, airier feeling of the Valtalena’s more classic look, one she describes as «very refreshing.»

Even the most simple tray ceiling, a recessed area that often reflects a room’s shape, adds a touch of visual impact. Tray ceilings grace several rooms in the Chatham, a three-bedroom, two-bath model home built by Taylor Morrison in Sandoval. The nearly 3,000-square-foot home, in the Maraval neighborhood, offers the feature in the oversized great room, formal dining room and master suite.

The builder’s other Sandoval model, the four-bedroom, three-and-a-half-bath Daphene, takes advantage of its two-story design by offering a volume ceiling in the family room.

Combined with natural light and chandeliers, ceilings with metallic finishes can add to the play of light in a room. The living room ceiling in the St. Croix, a three-bedroom, three-and-a-half-bath model home built by Keevan Homes in Verandah, has a shimmering metallic strié finish that complements the room’s Asian design. Many of the ceilings throughout the single-family home have decorative trays and crown molding. The dining room’s ceiling also is accented with a decorative medallion.

The St. Croix’s master bedroom has a three-step tray ceiling with faux finish and crown molding. The master bath has an octagonal tray ceiling with a painted surface, floating molding and rope lighting that adds drama.

Maskell also used a gold metallic finish in the den of Residence 1903, a three-bedroom, three-bath former model home in the Esperia South high-rise at Bonita Bay. The design, which won a multistate Aurora Award in 2008, also has a dramatic dining room ceiling finished with painted gray moldings in circles and squares.

«Just like anything in design, ceiling details change,» said Maskell. «We’re limited only by our imaginations and the feel we’re going for in a room.»

Simple sophisticated ceiling detailing creates stunning effect

BONITA SPRINGS — Now more than ever, there’s a reason to look up. To balance today’s popular trend of simple, clean-lined furniture and minimal accessories, interior designers and builders are turning to the ceiling, often called the «fifth wall,» to add artistic flair — everything from beams and dramatically lit coves to metallic finishes and grass cloth.

«Furniture has gotten simple; it’s not as ornate or as carved as it has been in the past,» said Janice Maskell, a designer with Robb & Stucky Interiors. «Ceiling details become important to add other architectural elements or texture to a room to make it interesting.»

Southwest Florida’s ceilings, which once rivaled those of mansions in Newport, R.I. with intricate groin vaults and elaborate murals and at times approached the level of the Sistine Chapel, are taking their cues from a general national trend to simplify — a movement that’s seeped into other industries, said Maskell. «Look at the new Bentleys and Jaguars, they’re simpler than they have been in the past,» she said. «Design, in general, is more simplified, too; designs are pulling back.»

Blame it on the economy or the cyclical nature of design, but ceilings are reflecting that trend, as well. «It’s not that the furniture is less expensive or less elegant,» Maskell said. «It’s just different.»

Simple ceiling treatments like beams with grass cloth inserts have become a new go to design statement, achieving both visual interest and texture. «It also adds a dimensional aspect,» said Maskell, who used beams in the great room and dining room ceilings of Residence 403, a three-bedroom, three-bath model in the new Tavira high-rise, The Lutgert Companies’ sixth luxury tower at Bonita Bay. The darkness of the wood-hued beams contrasts with the light furniture below, creating drama for the eye.

Maskell introduced the dark wood tones in the foyer’s tray ceiling, adding four wood-hued squares that reveal a hint of the lighter surface between and also anchor a gold lighting fixture. The light-and-dark contrast is heightened with wood crown molding around the perimeter of the tray.

Ceilings, said Maskell, also can set the design tone for a room. «There are three new models in Tavira, and each has a different feeling because of the ceilings,» she said. «One has a more traditional look. Another has what I call a South Hamptons look; it has light beadboard with a whitewash. It works well with the style of furniture that is in right now.»

Simple sophisticated ceiling detailing creates stunning effect - Naples Daily News

Maskell said wood is making a big comeback in ceiling design, also appearing as tongue-and-groove pecky cypress and beadboard paneling for a coastal island look. Crown molding that floats across the ceiling surface now hides cove lighting, an effect Maskell said «adds drama and a soft glow. People love it for entertaining, and it’s the perfect ambience for a cocktail party.»

Designers also are using paint, applied moldings, stenciling and beadboard cladding to embellish these surfaces. In recent years ceilings also have boasted custom-applied tissue paper and a wall covering that emulates the look of pressed tin. Murals have become passé, said Maskell. «No one seems to want the Venetian or traditional look. They want a transitional or contemporary design.»

The combination of beams and grass cloth is a design element interior designer Kathleen Scanlan, of Kathleen Scanlan Interiors, uses to bring «texture and warmth to a room.» Scanlan used the technique in the great room of the Sienna, Divco Construction Corp.’s first model home in Grand Arbors at TwinEagles, the 1,115-acre Naples community being developed by Bonita Bay Group. The custom single-family home, in the Hedgestone neighborhood, also has grass cloth within the coffers of the dining room ceiling.

«Today’s taller ceilings require elements to tone them down,» said Scanlan, who achieved that goal with two different paint values in the Sienna’s study.

Scanlan, who has worked with Divco for a dozen years, also sees a shift in the once popular Old World and more ornate features of previous homes. Today’s model homes, she says, are designed to reflect a more casual aesthetic, one that appeals to a younger clientele who favors more modern transitional design. «They want a more casual home, so we’re downplaying the formality that homes here used to have,» she said. «It really depends on the home and the height of the ceilings, but in general there has been a trend to less formal homes.»

Ceiling details are generally introduced in the foyer and found in the home’s more formal areas — dining and living rooms — and the rooms used most frequently by the owner, including the family room and master suite. The groin-vaulted foyer ceiling of The Newport Company’s Valtalena model in Mediterra has a painted trompe l’oeil effect that’s also carried into the custom single-family home’s dining room and hallways.

«Our faux-finishing team painted the ceiling to look like real stone bricks,» said Luisa Shafran, the principal of award-winning Landmark Design. «It creates a really interesting entry feature.»

The eye-tricking stone-and-block look continues into the groin vault of the adjoining gallery, which separates the living room and foyer, and is repeated in the dining room’s angled tray ceiling and an adjoining vestibule. Most of the ceilings throughout the four-bedroom model’s 5,800 square feet of air-conditioned living space have coffered or tray ceilings with thick crown molding. The living room’s 17-foot ceiling also has a subtle Greek key stencil encircling its perimeter.

Shafran added visual interest in the master bedroom and bath ceilings with subtle-colored Venetian plaster walls. The perimeter of the bathroom ceiling and the coffer in the master bedroom are stenciled with a gentle leaf motif.

A different trompe l’oeil effect was used in the family room ceiling — paint recreates the look of a real bamboo border that frames basket-weave detailing. Bamboo shoots reappear in the pool bath.

Shafran says the painted ceilings contrast the lighter, airier feeling of the Valtalena’s more classic look, one she describes as «very refreshing.»

Even the most simple tray ceiling, a recessed area that often reflects a room’s shape, adds a touch of visual impact. Tray ceilings grace several rooms in the Chatham, a three-bedroom, two-bath model home built by Taylor Morrison in Sandoval. The nearly 3,000-square-foot home, in the Maraval neighborhood, offers the feature in the oversized great room, formal dining room and master suite.

The builder’s other Sandoval model, the four-bedroom, three-and-a-half-bath Daphene, takes advantage of its two-story design by offering a volume ceiling in the family room.

Combined with natural light and chandeliers, ceilings with metallic finishes can add to the play of light in a room. The living room ceiling in the St. Croix, a three-bedroom, three-and-a-half-bath model home built by Keevan Homes in Verandah, has a shimmering metallic strié finish that complements the room’s Asian design. Many of the ceilings throughout the single-family home have decorative trays and crown molding. The dining room’s ceiling also is accented with a decorative medallion.

The St. Croix’s master bedroom has a three-step tray ceiling with faux finish and crown molding. The master bath has an octagonal tray ceiling with a painted surface, floating molding and rope lighting that adds drama.

Maskell also used a gold metallic finish in the den of Residence 1903, a three-bedroom, three-bath former model home in the Esperia South high-rise at Bonita Bay. The design, which won a multistate Aurora Award in 2008, also has a dramatic dining room ceiling finished with painted gray moldings in circles and squares.

«Just like anything in design, ceiling details change,» said Maskell. «We’re limited only by our imaginations and the feel we’re going for in a room.»

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